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HELPUNITED, THE HOTLINE DIRECTORY, AND NATIONAL HOTLINE VOLUNTEERS MONTH

HelpUnited is a project that we plan to roll out in a few years. Our goal is to be a watchdog service for the hotline industry, and a resource for all hotline volunteers to collaborate and to exercise their clout by joining, to make recommendations about hotline best practices.
 

Through our efforts on the Hotline Directory project, we have learned that no one knows how many hotlines are operating in the US. When we began the project, we expected to find ten thousand hotlines, helplines, and chat lines. However, our estimates were not even close. As of the winter of 2022, we have found almost one million services in the US.
 

We have several concerns about the hotline industry. The duplicative work, recreating the wheel repeatedly, for things like building hotline volunteers training programs, is astounding. The amount of nonprofit services doing identical work to others that do identical work is nothing short of shocking. We believe that there is a misuse of money, donated dollars and grants, because of no oversight or self-regulation in the hotline industry is beyond wasteful. It's impossible to compile a list of these services, because there are no laws, rules, or regulations that require registration.
 

There are countless examples of blatantly obvious waste that don't require investigation. For example, many hotlines build their own training programs for their hotline workers from scratch. The plain fact is that it is easy to find open source training courses online. Also, each hotline service has its own volunteer recruitment programs. It could not be more obvious to anyone with a modicum of commonsense that recruiting volunteers on a large scale basis, with many hotlines sharing in the cost, would save millions. This approach would improve the caliber of training programs, and work towards developing best practices for recruitment and training.
 

Sharing advertising expenses for recruiting volunteers, while expanding the reach of volunteer
recruitment advertising. Without regulations, the hotline industry will continue to waste valuable resources, reduce the effectiveness and caliber of volunteers, and continue recreating the wheel.

 

We hope to build the infrastructure for a project designed to help nonprofit hotlines to reign in
their wasteful spending by offering sensible solutions. Our plan includes recruiting hotline volunteers and hotline staff to join us on this project. With a lot of elbow grease, and by stepping on some hotline executive, we can make tremendous, positive change.

For example, the following are just a few sensible, dynamic best practices that could improve the hotline industry, so that callers and texters can be better served:


1. Industry acknowledgement that hotlines should not compete for callers and texters.
2. The hotline industry should work towards uniformity in training standards, by consolidating and sharing training programs.
3. Sharing costs of advertising to pursue recruitment of volunteers by the hotline industry interviewing, placement, and continued education.
4. The hotline industry requires best practices to operate in a more uniform and, therefore, meaningful way.
5. The hotline industry needs to self regulate by creating a panel/group of industry workers from volunteers, to development, to marketing, to executives. This regulating authority should make recommendations about best practices and money saving practices, to be voted on and adopted by the industry.


Our volunteers have identified hundreds of thousands of hotlines, helplines, and chat lines. And, they have written descriptions about each, so that people in need can easily search for the right service on our website. Our efforts have showed to us that there are too many large, advertising oriented, powerful hotline services. And that many of these services cannot handle the flow of callers and texters. As a result, callers and texters are not receiving proper help.


These larger sized nonprofit hotlines become inflated by dedicating their efforts and resources towards savvy advertising. Some larger services must route inbound calls to small services, because they've invested so much into advertising their brand.

 

Became there is no government or industry oversight of the enormous hotline industry, executives; pay goes unmonitored. This is not only a waste of money, it's a danger to the people who call hotlines expecting to receive expert services, but meet with improperly trained volunteers. High school and college students staff many of these hotlines. They do their best, but we know that most are volunteering, not because of their concern for people, as much as their need to have a mandatory amount of volunteer hours for their resumes.


As a result, frequently, hotline callers and texters speak with 16-year-old kids, with a couple of days of training under their belts. They cannot properly equip children to answer questions from people who are in desperate circumstances and in need of help from a professional.
 

We don't allow 16-year-old kids to hang shingles outside an office to open their own psychology practice. Often, these 16-year-old kids are taking on the responsibility of well-seasoned psychologists. People have typically reached a breaking point when they gather the courage to call a hotline.
 

They regularly rout these callers to volunteers who are simply not qualified to handle these types of calls and text messages. Hotlines are called by people who have probably hit rock bottom and have no other place to turn. Hotline based nonprofits can be the recipients of large amount of money through donations and grants.
 

Oversight of these nonprofits would include following the money to establish that hotlines use money properly. We can all agree that the money should ensure that skilled, well-trained people handle calls. And, that hotlines should use their income in a manner that best benefits users of their service. Are hotline spending their income the way they should? We believe it's fair to assume that, most times, they don't.
 

Our research and interviews support a conclusion that, without a third party intervening in the hotline industry to facilitate self-regulation, as described above, the hotline industry will remain broken. Frankly, it's just too easy to start a nonprofit hotline, and to use it as a source of income for its foundered and executives.

One only needs a seat at a cell phone to start a hotline. That's one reason hundreds of thousands of hotlines exist today. Medium to large sized hotline nonprofits have executives whose salaries they tie to the salaries of other similarity sized nonprofits.
 

Even if only a small percentage of the hundreds of thousands of hotlines pay executives, similarly to other nonprofits, then there are likely tens of thousands of executives pay large salaries. If our supposition is accurate, then there is no incentive for hotlines to merge their services. Because there is a disincentive to hotline nonprofits to merge with other hotlines, and there's no leverage to make consolidation happen, savvy businesspeople will continue to start up new hotline nonprofit services.
What more proof do we require? The facts speak for themselves. New hotline services are open
every day.

 

The volume of hotline nonprofit speaks to a much larger problem. Some nonprofits misuse and
abuse the system. Too many businesspeople create nonprofits to make money over the purpose of helping others.

 

Can HelpUnited change what is clearly an endemic problem in the nonprofit industry?
 

Definitely.
 

The hotline industry is a great place to start. Creating a buzz around the issues described above will be the primary mission of helpunited.org. We hope to solicit help from as many people as possible to create enough clout to take on the role of a watchdog for the hotline industry.
 

We will continue to collect data from users of the Hotline Directory, who voluntarily share information with us about their hotline experiences. That data, over a period, will show trends and provide statistics of value to HelpUnited. We hope to encourage present and former hotline volunteers and staff to join HelpUnited.

One way we have already improved the hotline industry through our Annual National Hotline Volunteer Month. We see our plans for HelpUnited as the most important mission for What.ngo. It will also be the
most difficult to pursue.

POST INTENSIVE CARE SYNDROME

what.NGO has made a significant commitment to informing the public about Post Intensive Care Syndrome ("PICS") through our AfterICU, and PostICU projects. We have taken on a mission to educate people around the world about symptoms to be wary of after an ICU hospital stay, and serious health concerns associated with PICS. We provide information about available of resources, and a online library of research, articles and up-to-date news about PICS.
 

Whatever the reasons may be, we see hundreds of millions of dollars being donated and granted to nonprofits, who repeatedly recreate the same wheel, as a misuse of funds which should be designated to direct services. We all know that nonprofits that provide identical services could easily merge, with the goal of reducing executives' pay, rent, equipment and countless other things. We also all know that nonprofits are not likely going to reduce their flow of inbound cash, to benefit a common good.

 

All we can do is try to set an example, and hope that over time, our mission, which we know must be a concern of many people goes viral. Obviously, change is not around the corner. Any changes will not come from government regulations, it must come from within specific nonprofit areas of specialization. For example, the work of the Hotline Directory includes providing a free source directory of hotlines, helplines, and chat lines to any school or nonprofit entity that needs it. This is the proper approach versus charging those entities a large sum of money to license this list.
 

The Hotline Directory built a listing of 500K+ hotline services. We invite everyone to search our directory, to help with deciding which hotline might best meet people's needs/ Our long-term mission is to collect as much data as possible, from hotline users, rating and reviewing their experiences with hotlines. We do not believe that this data exists, and we believe that the statistics that such data will offer is invaluable. Of course, our plan is to share all such data responsibly with researchers. They can use the data to generate statistics that could be used to motivate the hotline industry and it's volunteers, to build a watch dog entity to oversee the industry and compile such things as hotline best practices. Bringing some uniformity to the 100s of thousands of hotlines that exist in the US is an extremely important goal. We're starting from scratch.
 

However, many others have already performed outstanding research into the efficacy of the nonprofit industry. We hope that the hotline industry will pay attention to the great research that has already exists, performed by brilliant investigators, about the tremendous waste in the nonprofit business. Combining all the existing research and adding unbiased investigators who understand the issues, which are so varied they cannot be enumerated in a blog post. If we get a few people to agree with us about the seriousness of these issues, and this topic becomes one worthy of discussion between decision makers, then we are meeting our mission. We ask our readers to think about the benefits of nonprofits cooperating, the potential results from those who operate nonprofits having the humility to recognize their unintentional misuse of funds by duplicating the efforts of others, and the value of help from people whose primary goal is to help people who need help from nonprofits, not to make a living at their expense.
 

We are not making any friends taking the position that we have. But, should likability stand in the way of doing the right thing? Is that why you are an executive, employee and/or donor of nonprofits, to make friends and to not rock the boat?


What should your personal mission be, as a philanthropist or volunteer for nonprofits? Shouldn't you have a say in the way nonprofits do business? Who better than you is in a position to encourage change?
Wrapping up this inglorious blog post?

PostICU
We stand as the only patient built advocacy and information, 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation,
providing information and advocacy on behalf of former ICU patients, their caregivers, and
families related to Post Intensive Care Syndrome ("PICS").
As we move through uncharted waters, as former ICU patients, rather than medical
professionals, we will rely upon the growing knowledge base and underlying support by the
medical community for proactive medical care of former and future ICU patients.
PostICU's membership is free and available to all who are interested in or effected by PICS. Our
website provides a source of new and information to people suffering from PICS and PICS-F.
PostICU's mission is to grow our membership ranks, so that we can become better positioned to
effectively advocate on behalf of former and future ICU patients.

Because more than one-half of the over six million patients that stay in ICUs annually will suffer
from PICS, we hope to get a seat at the table with critical care professionals, hospital decision
makers and the health insurance industry, so that we can represent PICS and PICS-F sufferers
by making recommendations about ways to incorporate PICS education and treatment at
hospitals with OCUs and to advocate for systematic follow-up care for the known and likely
symptoms which ICU patients suffer from after they are discharged.
The more members that join PostICU, the better chances we will have at having our voices
heard by, and our recommendations considered by the critical care medical community and
health insurance companies.
So please join PostICU today.
AfterICU, and our sister agency PostICU, are proud to announce the reorganization of our
agencies under the umbrella of Worldwide Help Alliance Team, Inc., ("What.ngo") a 501(c)(3)
corporation. What.ngo’s primary mission is to help educate people around the world about
international health concerns. Their secondary mission is to help educate nonprofit
organizations, their executives, staff, volunteers, and donors about ways to reduce the misuse
of financial resources donated and granted to nonprofit entities.
What.ngo, f/k/a North American Help Services Alliance, Inc. continues to grow its services. With
regard to its effort to meet its critical missions, the most significant of which is to lead by its
example(s). The mission to operate its agency without had paid staff or paid executives.
Understandably, the agency's progress is a bit slower than nonprofits with paid staff.
However, this aspect of What.ngo's mission is too important to change. Because, educating the
public, which includes executives at hundreds of thousands of nonprofit agencies, about the
duplicative efforts of most agencies, of other nonprofit agencies work has spun out of control.
Whatever the reasons may be, we see hundreds of millions of dollars being donated and
granted to nonprofits, to recreate the same wheel over and over again, as a misuse of funds
which should be designated to direct services.
We all know that nonprofits that provide identical services could easily merge, with the goal of
reducing executives pay, rent, equipment and countless other things. We also all know that
nonprofits will not willingly reduce their flow of inbound cash, to benefit a common good. All we
can do, is try to set an example, and hope that over time, our mission, which we know must be a
concern of many people, goes viral.
Obviously, change is not around the corner. Any changes will not come from government
regulations, it must come from within specific nonprofit areas of specialization.

For example, the work of the Hotline Directory, includes providing a free, open source directory
of hotlines, helplines, and chat lines to any school or nonprofit entity that needs it. This, we
believe, is
After the ICU
We believe that the best way we can help the 5,000,0000+ people who will have an ICU
experience in 2017 and the medical professionals that will treat them, is to share all available
documentation and information about the definition, epidemiology, clinical manifestations,
evaluation, treatment, and outcomes for patients with PICS and family members with PICS-F.

Although there is no official definition for post-intensive care syndrome ["PICS"] or post intensive
care syndrome for family members ["PICS-F"], most clinicians agree that PICS and PICS-F
constitute new or worsening function in one or more of the following domains after critical
illness: physical impairments, cognitive function and psychological function.

Advances in critical care medicine have resulted in a growing population of survivors of critical
illness. Many survivors experience impairment in cognition, mental health, and physical function,
known as PICS. The mental health of family members, caregivers, and even friends may also
be adversely affected, the term used for this is PICS-Family or PICS-F. One goal of the
AftertheICU team is to develop an online library of most of the online documentation and
information regarding PICS and PICS-F. In the medical community, both in the United States
and around the world.

We hope that our website becomes a "go to" resource for those in the medical community who
are interested in learning about PICS and PICS-F as well as ICU patients and their families.

After the ICU invites medical professionals to share their links to websites, articles, research
and any other online materials about Post Intensive Care Syndrome ["PICS"] with us.
More After theICU
What is AftertheICU ("AICU")?

We are a group of doctors, former patients, stakeholders and other healthcare professionals,
working together to provide ICU patients, their families, and other medical professionals with
information about the road to recovery after critical illness.

There is a woefully inadequate amount of information about PICS being communicated to the
millions of former ICU patients, at least half of whom are suffering from PICS symptoms. We
hope that this website will be a hub for accomplishing our mission to "get the word out" about
PICS to as many people as possible who are suffering from PICS. We hope that you will join us
in this effort.

We believe that the best way we can help the 5,000,0000+ people who will have an ICU
experience in 2017 and the medical professionals that will treat them, is to share all available
documentation and information about the definition, epidemiology, clinical manifestations,
evaluation, treatment, and outcomes for patients with PICS and family members with PICS-F.
​Advances in critical care medicine have resulted in a growing population of survivors of critical
illness. Many survivors experience impairment in cognition, mental health, and physical function,
known as PICS. The mental health of family members, caregivers, and even friends may also
be adversely affected, the term used for this is PICS-Family or PICS-F. One goal of the
AftertheICU team is to develop an online library of most of the online documentation and
information regarding PICS and PICS-F. In the medical community both in the United States
and around the world
After the ICU invites medical professionals to share their links to websites, articles, research
and any other online materials about Post Intensive Care Syndrome ["PICS"] with us. Click here
for a listing, in alphabetical order by names of authors, of online documentation relative to all
aspects of PICS and PICS-F.
Hotline Directory
The two divisions of NAHSA are #4Help and HelpUnited. Our agency has NO paid staff or
executives. We have over 40 volunteers operating various aspects of our company.
Our mission is to share our database of all hotlines, helplines, text chat and web chat services
built from from scratch. People in need of such a service, search our directory on our website or
call #4Help (#44357) from their cell phone.
Our directory contains 50,000 services, and we've made it easy to search.
Following a search, searchers, callers and texters can choose to be routed to their selected
service using a masked phone number by using "Click to Call" and "Click to Text" buttons.
#4Help also collects objective data about hotlines to whom we route users, and we collect user
feedback about services. We are collecting this data so that within a couple of years, we should
have useful statistics about many services to share with the public.
Services can claim their pages and update them by adding additional information, logos, videos,
company brochures, etc.
We built #4Help for many reasons, primarily to be a helpful tool to everyone searching for the
best hotline that matches their needs. Secondarily, since there are no government regulations
covering the hotline industry, we hope to share collected data which may be instrumental in
taking steps forward towards self-regulation.

HelpUnited was built to help the hotline industry to develop self oversight. We are inviting past
and and present hotline volunteers to join HelpUnited to collaborate in the creation of best
practices, that can be recommended to hotline executives.
Focusing on hotline budgets by working on not recreating the wheel as new and existing
hotlines expand their technologies is critical.
HelpUnited is the outreach arm of #4Help, through initiatives such as National Hotline
Volunteers Month, we make people aware of #4Help services, while creating opportunities to
honor the work of hotline volunteers.
HelpUnited
Help United is an opportunity for hotline volunteers to connect. Given that there are thousands
of hotlines and helplines that rely on volunteer staff, there should be an organization to combine
the voices of every volunteer in a productive way, so that the safety, interests and goals of
volunteers are understood and respected by the agencies to whom we donate our time.
There are more individuals in need of hotline services than ever. Creating a unified block of
volunteers, is one way to meet that rising demand.
We are concerned that some agencies in the hotline industry are overly concerned with
protecting their brand and to generating leads (more leads than some can handle) to the
detriment of people in need and to new agencies trying to work their way into this super-
competitive industry. Whether by design or not, new agencies are discouraged, or their entry is
slowed down by massive PPC advertising and investments in powerful SEO.
If the hotline industry is so overburdened that it must route callers to smaller agencies to cover,
then we have to explore who protecting industry share actually benefits. Does this practice do a
disservice to the people we serve and to the volunteers who are often stretched too thin?

We believe the hotline industry is incumbent on the hotline industry, since it is made up of well-
meaning nonprofit and governmental agencies to collaborate. Why should a new agency have
to recreate the wheel when they set up their new hotline or helpline?
One area that volunteers can help with is by joining the Help United Setup Team. This team can
assist existing hotlines and new hotlines with a host of services that will make recreation of the
wheel a thing of the past. We can deliver:
— implementation of all required hotline systems,
— programs for best practices and training
— updating agency basic operational systems
— providing access to the latest virtual PBX technology

Since volunteers work in all facets of hotline work, we can help to set up turn key services with
ease.

Because we volunteer for hotline services, we're well positioned to volunteer to help improve the
services that individuals receive in all hotlines.
For example, one project that HelpUnited could build hat is an out of the box virtual PBX phone
system, out of the box and priced way below cost which would, of course, greatly improve call
response time, while saving hotlines thousands of dollars.

HelpUnited, with unified volunteers can dig deep into the hotline industry to save money and
improve services, a few examples are:
— unified training,
— group insurance coverage,
— better protections for volunteers health and safety,
— programs to help reduce executive and middle management by unifying projects
There is strength in numbers, and real change comes by organizing those numbers and
reminding them of the clout they carry.
HelpUnited has its work cut out for them. Change is difficult. Please consider helping us.
Visit helpunited.org, celebrate National Hotline Volunteers Month with us and select your
nomination for hotline volunteer of the year, along with any stories that we can share with the
public during NHVM.
Together we can move the immovable.

Additional Hotline Stuff
Our Mission is to provide everyone in the United States in need of a hotline or helpline service
with easy access to all options that best match their needs. We've done this by building a
searchable database containing over 100,000 hotlines, helplines, and chat lines. Each service is
given a free dynamic page on our site, with details about the service and feedback from users of
the service.
Services can claim their page, correct anything that requires editing on their page, and add as
much additional information about their service as they choose.

If you see that we're missing a hotline or helpline that you know of, we ask that you kindly
provide us with information about the missing service, so that we can add it to our directory.
When claiming a hotline, please update your page by adding photos, videos, brochures, and
other content to feature your agency's services.

We support all hotlines and helplines
What.ngo
To optimize and ease management of several individual nonprofit projects, we have
consolidated several projects under one moniker.
Our new moniker is Worldwide Help Alliance Team, Inc. ("What.ngo"), has replaced our original
organization name, North American Help Services Alliance, Inc.
Worldwide Help Alliance Team, Inc. is now the primary 501(c)3 hub for all of our group's
nonprofit endeavors.
What.ngo works on multiple fronts, addressing unique national and international issues.
These issues/projects include:
America's Hotline Directory, is a national hotline, helpline, and chat line directory. We have
compiled a database of over 100,000 services, providing detailed information about each. Our
easy to search database provides equal exposure to all services. We do not accept pay per
click advertising or donations from services.
See 4help.org
Our nonprofit work related to education and advocacy about Post Intensive Care Syndrome can
still be found at the websites listed below.
See, posticu.org and aftertheicu.org
Recently, we introduced an anti-tobacco nonprofit campaign to the international community.
The Stomp Out Tobacco Challenge is slated to go live in the summer of 2022. Our challenge
and petition will be made available to every country, subject to their jurisdictional regulations.
All participants will receive awards for their participation, and winners will receive what we hope
will be a valuable, special award.
See buttout.io and stompouttobacco.org
StompOut Tobacco
Our mission is straightforward. We plan to get more signatures on our StompOut Tobacco
Petition than any petition ever has.

Why? There is power in numbers. By securing enough signatures, we will have the clout
required to influence political action.
With enough signatures on our petition, it will be our entrée into international political
conversations about making the mass production and sale of tobacco products illegal.
Once ready, we will distribute copies of our petition to as many politicians and "decision makers"
from every country around the world as possible. We will ask them to help us meet our mission
to save millions of lives by ending the manufacturing and sale of tobacco products.
More What.ngo
Our Mission is to provide everyone in the United States in need of a hotline or helpline service
with easy access to all options that best match their needs. We've done this by building a
searchable database containing over 100,000 hotlines, helplines, and chat lines. Each service is
given a free dynamic page on our site, with details about the service and feedback from users of
the service.
Services can claim their page, correct anything that requires editing on their page, and add as
much additional information about their service as they choose.

If you see that we're missing a hotline or helpline that you know of, we ask that you kindly
provide us with information about the missing service, so that we can add it to our directory.
When claiming a hotline, please update your page by adding photos, videos, brochures, and
other content to feature your agency's services.
#4Help supports all hotlines and helplines
OUR ADDITIONAL SERVICES
Click on a service, below, to learn more:
Read & Give Feedback About Hotline Experience
Check Out Our Hotline Statistics
Learn About Our Volunteer Opportunities
Learn Why & How We Use Masked Phone Numbers
JOIN THE #4HELP MAILING LIST TO RECEIVE UPDATES
We'll keep you up-to-date on news and developments at #4Help

Join
Submit
DROP US A LINE
Call 24/7/365 (800) 580-1500 | Email support@4help.org
Our agency is operated exclusively by volunteers. We have no paid staff and no paid
executives. ONLY 100% volunteers.
As such, every volunteer is treated equally. If a volunteer wants to learn more or do more, then
they can.
We have volunteers that work a few hours a week, and we have volunteers that work full time.
There is room for ANYONE who wants to join our team. To learn more, please visit our
Volunteer Team Page.
SUPPORTING AMERICA'S HOTLINES, HELPLINES, AND CHAT LINES.

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